Why We Need a Good Shepherd

1

LISTEN NOW!

September 30, 2020

John 10:14-21

“I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep and my sheep know me—just as the Father knows me and I know the Father—and I lay down my life for the sheep. I have other sheep that are not of this sheep pen. I must bring them also. They too will listen to my voice, and there shall be one flock and one shepherd. The reason my Father loves me is that I lay down my life—only to take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down and authority to take it up again. This command I received from my Father.”

The Jews who heard these words were again divided. Many of them said, “He is demon-possessed and raving mad. Why listen to him?”

But others said, “These are not the sayings of a man possessed by a demon. Can a demon open the eyes of the blind?”

CONSIDER THIS

Sometimes the more familiar we are with a particular Scripture text the less we understand it. We can know something by heart yet not really know it at all. The Lord’s Prayer falls into this category for many. Even more so, the Twenty-Third Psalm also comes to mind. I’m not sure I have ever officiated or been to a funeral where we didn’t recite Psalm 23. In fact, that’s about where I had this text filed: funerals. I guess that “valley of the shadow of death” line does it.

I’m not sure why, but this psalm has risen to prominence in my life of late. I’m overwhelmed every time I work my way through it. Far from a death psalm, it is a life psalm. Green pastures, still waters, paths of righteousness, feasting in the presence of enemies, cups of blessing running over, and on the psalm goes.

“The Lord is my shepherd. I shall not want” (Ps. 23:1). When we are well shepherded we need not worry about anything because the shepherd provides everything. Jesus draws water from this ancient well of divine revelation when he says, “I am the good shepherd.” Think back through John’s Gospel. Jesus sat us down in the vast green pasture where he fed us with fishes and loaves. He took us to the deep waters of Jacob’s well and introduced us to living water. His presence, countenance, and words have restored our souls every step of the way.

I would like to press on through the Psalm and explore more of the incredible connections with the Gospel of Jesus; however, the Holy Spirit is prompting me to stop and invite you to do this work instead. You will be inspired. You might consider joining in with the Daily Text private Facebook group’s conversation.

THE PRAYER

Abba Father, we thank you for your Son, Jesus, our Good Shepherd. Because he takes care of everything, we need not worry about anything. Thank you for this gift of perfect security. Come, Holy Spirit, and bring this word to life for me. We pray in Jesus’ name, amen.

THE QUESTIONS

1. What is your history with Psalm 23? Spend a few minutes meditating on it each day this week.

2. Do you know Jesus as your Good Shepherd? Does this remain a high ideal or is it becoming a reality in your life?

3. What connections are you making between Jesus and the Gospel of John and Psalm 23?

Today, and every Wednesday at noon central time, we gather on a global Zoom call to sow together for a great awakening in prayer. It is powerful. Would you join us today? ZOOM LINK HERE.

For the Awakening,
J.D. Walt
Sower-in-Chief
seedbed.com

SHARE

Farmer. Poet. Theologian. Jurist. Publisher. Seedbed's Sower-in-Chief.

1 COMMENT

  1. Psalm 23 is one o my favorite Scripture verses. I was required to memorize it during confirmation class. At the nursing home Bible study I facilitated, it was the most requested Psalm to be read. I do know Jesus as the good shepherd and being a Gentile believer , I know I’m amongst the other sheep not of this sheep pen. During this time of uncertainty, it helps me to realize I’m not in control, but Jesus is. While I never directly made this connection before, I had made the connection between Jesus and the promise made to Israel through the prophet Ezekiel chapter 34.

LEAVE A REPLY