The Doctrine of Sin Matters

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The Bible teaches that the fundamental problem in our world is human sinfulness. Sin affects not only our own personal lives, but the lives of others, including the harmful consequences on future generations. Ultimately, creation itself is subject to the pain and suffering resultant of human sinfulness. As creator and sustainer of our entire universe, sin is also an offense against God himself. The life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ is the solution for human sinfulness, and the Holy Spirit was given to eradicate sin from our lives.

Watch today’s Seven Minute Seminary video from Matt O’Reilly on why the doctrine of sin matters and three resulting pastoral implications.

Download the one-page PDF group discussion guide here.

Download the audio for this Seven Minute Seminary & subscribe via iTunes.

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Dr. Matt O’Reilly is pastor of St. Mark United Methodist Church in Mobile, Alabama, a fellow of the Center for Pastor Theologians, and an adjunct member of the faculties at Asbury Theological Seminary and Wesley Biblical Seminary. Connect at mattoreilly.net or follow @mporeilly.

2 COMMENTS

  1. I am one of those who understands the doctrine of sin as a separation from God. When one responds to God’s call to faith in Jesus, sin looses its strength – it looses its sting. It seems to me that the great promises of new life then come into play. Spirit fills us, and love makes sin irrelevant. The love of God is shed abroad in our hearts and makes relationship paramount. This is a reciprocal relationship. Anything that would separate us from God is revealed to us by Spirit. We listen, and we respond. The Spirit, the word, and the body all work together to encourage us towards our Father.
    Sin cannot thrive in this condition. It will atrophy in the presence of the God head and the body of the King.

    In my experience, the exhortation to Christ and the Spirit conquerors those things that would separate us from God (sin).

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