OPPOSING LOVE

TEXT

Matthew 12:1-21
At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath. His disciples were hungry and began to pick some heads of grain and eat them.  When the Pharisees saw this, they said to him, “Look! Your disciples are doing what is unlawful on the Sabbath.”
He answered, “Haven’t you read what David did when he and his companions were hungry?  He entered the house of God, and he and his companions ate the consecrated bread—which was not lawful for them to do, but only for the priests.  Or haven’t you read in the Law that the priests on Sabbath duty in the temple desecrate the Sabbath and yet are innocent?  I tell you that one greater than the temple is here.  If you had known what these words mean, ‘I desire mercy, not sacrifice,’ you would not have condemned the innocent.  For the Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath.”
Going on from that place, he went into their synagogue, and a man with a shriveled hand was there.  Looking for a reason to accuse Jesus, they asked him, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?”
He said to them, “If any of you has a sheep and it falls into a pit on the Sabbath, will you not take hold of it and lift it out?  How much more valuable is a human being than a sheep!  Therefore it is lawful to do good on the Sabbath.”
Then he said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.”  So he stretched it out and it was completely restored, just as sound as the other.  But the Pharisees went out and plotted how they might kill Jesus.
Aware of this, Jesus withdrew from that place.  Many followed him, and he healed all their sick, warning them not to tell who he was.  This was to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah:
“Here is my servant whom I have chosen,
the one I love, in whom I delight;
I will put my Spirit on him,
and he will proclaim justice to the nations.
He will not quarrel or cry out;
no one will hear his voice in the streets.
A bruised reed he will not break,
and a smoldering wick he will not snuff out,
till he leads justice to victory.
In his name the nations will put their hope.” [Isaiah 42:1-4]
TNIV

COMMENT

“One greater than the temple is here”—could it be?  And when he sought to give life, when he sought to rescue the bruised reeds, the Pharisees plotted to kill him.  “Many followed him”—but they weren’t following the Pharisees.  “In his name the nations would put their hope”—but they placed no hope in the Pharisees.  They envied him, it seems; at the root of their zealous disapproval, perhaps, lay a deadly thistle of envy.  It may not be far removed from modern Christian workers, either.  There is nothing so deadly for friendships, and nothing so diametrically opposed to love.

READ

“Love envieth not.”  This is love in competition with others.  Whenever you attempt a good work you will find others doing the same kind of work, and probably doing it better.  Envy them not.  Envy is a feeling of ill-will to those who are in the same line as ourselves, a spirit of covetousness and detraction.  Christian work is little protection against unchristian feeling!  Envy, that most despicable of all the unworthy moods which cloud a Christian’s soul, assuredly waits for us on the threshold of every work, unless we are fortified with this grace of magnanimity.  Only one thing truly need the Christian envy—the large, rich, generous soul which “envieth not.”
—Henry Drummond (1851-1897)

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