Second Breakfast: XLVIII

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And that we need not fear this instrument to be a snare to us, or that the duty must end in scruple, vexation, and eternal fears, we must remember, that the life of every man may be so ordered (and indeed must) that it may be a perpetual serving of God: the greatest trouble and most busy trade and worldly encumbrances, when they are necessary, or charitable, or profitable in order to any of those ends which we are bound to serve, whether public or private, being a doing of God’s work. For God provides the good things of the world to serve the needs of nature, by the labours of the ploughman the skill and pains of the artisan, and the dangers and traffic of the merchant: these men are, in their callings, the ministers of the Divine Providence, and the stewards of the creation, and servants of a great family of God, the world…

So that no man can complain that his calling takes him off from religion; his calling itself, and his very worldly employment in honest trades and offices, is a serving of God; and, if it be moderately pursued and according to the rules of Christian prudence, will leave void spaces enough for prayers and retirements of a more spiritual religion.

-Jeremy Taylor, “Rule and Exercies of Holy Living and Dying” in Seeds: A Scattering of Groundbreaking Ideas


This week’s “Second Breakfasts” are taken from the compilation work named above. We are proud to present a brief resource to you whose message is richly transformative and which serves as the foundation for Seedbed’s distinctive spiritual-theological heritage. Find Seeds here.

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