March 19: Psalm 91

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March 19: Psalm 91

The only permanent refuge

87.87 D                     Hyfrydol (Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus), p. 169
Beecher (Love Divine), p. 149

Who with God Most High finds shelter in th’Almighty’s shadow hides.

To the Lord I’ll say, “My Refuge!” In my God my trust abides.

From the fowler’s snare He’ll save you, from the deadly pestilence;

Cover you with outspread pinions, make His wings your confidence.

God’s own truth, your shield and buckler; you will fear no ill by night,

Nor the shafts in daylight flying, nor disease that shuns the light,

Nor the plague that wastes at noonday. At your side ten thousand fall;

You will only see this judgment which comes to the wicked all.

You have made the Lord your refuge, God Most High your dwelling-place;

Nothing evil shall befall you; in your tent no scourge you’ll face.

He will angels charge to keep you, guard you well in all your ways.

In their hands they will uphold you lest your foot a stone should graze.

You shall trample serpents, lions, tread on all your deadly foes.

“For his love to Me I’ll save him, keep him, for My name he knows;

When he calls Me I will answer, save and honor him will I.

I will show him my salvation, with long life will satisfy.”

Psalm 91 has always ranked among the more favorite and popular psalms of Christian people… it is one of the very few psalms about which everyone in antiquity agreed (East and West) should be prayed each day of the week. One observes the sustained persuasion that this psalm has to do with divine protection from satanic attack, speaking of deliverance from several sorts of demons: the snare of the trapper, the deadly pestilence, the terror of night, or arrow which flies by day, the pestilence in darkness, the destruction at noon, the plague and lion and cobra. There is no doubt that demons attack our souls with a great assortment of temptations and trials, described in Holy Scripture with manifold symbols and metaphors. It is particularly ironic that Psalm 91, so descriptive of demonic attack, is the one psalm actually used and quoted by Satan to tempt our Lord (Matthew 4:6; Luke 4:10-11). (Reardon, p.179-180)

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