Church History Archives - Seedbed

For many today, notions of “the wrath of God” may seem outdated, questionable, or even backward. Regardless, the theme of God’s wrath permeates all of Scripture and was a central theme in the DNA of the Wesleyan revival. Paul Lawler offers 4 reasons why we should retain this important doctrine.

Ever wonder where all the female saints are? Though many treatments of church history overlook their role, they're there, even from a young age. Read this list of 10 young female saints who can inspire your own walk with God.

The Jerusalem Council in Acts 15 has gotten a lot of attention of late. Those who want to change The United Methodist Church’s position on same-sex practices cite it frequently. Did James and the other apostles decide that portions of the Mosaic law no longer applied to them? In what ways is our current debate similar to and different from the Jerusalem Council?

Within a few months of beginning field preaching in 1739, Wesley had set up the basic structure that was to mark Methodism for more than a century: Societies, Bands, and Class Meetings.

What did Bonhoeffer think about the theology he found upon his arrival in America? James Heidinger weighs in.

This week is the 499th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. Andrew Dragos shares 7 things you may not know about it.

All of the 150 psalms have been shaped out of divine inspiration and authorization as well as human spirituality including the intellect, emotions, body,...

Michael Hawn, a professor of church music at Perkins School of Theology, uses two basic categories when speaking about music in the church: cyclical and sequential. Modern worship music has morphed into a form somewhere between the two.

Contemporary Pentecostalism is in many ways an offshoot of Wesleyan-Arminian spirituality and theology via the American Holiness movement. Pentecostals specifically identify conversion, sanctification, divine healing, and the premillennial second coming of Jesus as Wesleyan-Arminian-Holiness themes that particularly impacted the formative stages of their movement’s development.

Since the early Church didn't have a New Testament, how did they make disciples? In today's article, Steve Bruns reveals that the corporate worship service itself was when Christians were discipled in a general way and had access to Old Testament Scriptures, which were authoritative texts for the Church.