Sacraments | Seedbed

Before we stylized the sacrament to make it expedient for large worship gatherings, the early church had some very distinct practices surrounding the communion. Watch this Seven Minute Seminary with Dr. Ruth Anne Reese as she explains the historical backdrop of the early church's experience with the Last Supper.

How exactly does liturgy form us, and how might the adoption of the Christian calendar help disciple us in the image of Christ? Watch this video interview with Marty Reardon as he explains a critical element of worship design.

It was here, in Holy Communion, that the Church saw fully and completely what the potential cost of discipleship entailed: death. And yet it was literal good news, because despite his death, Jesus Christ was currently present with them in this very act of Holy Communion. Read more from Steve Bruns' series on the early church and discipleship.

What wonders unfold when we consider the Eucharist in light of the holy mystery that is the Trinity? Chris Green shares his musings on what the Eucharist becomes as he surveys the work of each of the three members of the Triune God.

Catechism is a term first introduced by Martin Luther to denote a formal method of teaching the basics of christian beliefs, specifically focusing on...

There is only one baptism, so how is baptism a part of our daily discipleship at all? Andrew Thompson explains how we are to integrate our baptism into the daily living-out of our faith.

Why do Christians take communion? In this Seven Minute Seminary video, Dr. Robert Stamps explains what happens at communion and why it's so important for Christians to regularly celebrate the Eucharist. He suggests that it has more to do with what happens to us than what happens to the elements.

Read Wesleyan Catechesis: The Role of Sacraments and Confirmation, Part I. --- Why then did Wesley also delete the catechism from The Sunday Service? Was it...

For many people, not only is there a paradoxical tension of anonymity and unity at the communion table, but at times, communion has been reduced to mere ritual and formality- something we should do, but without any real sense of why.

Scripture plainly says again and again that Christ offered himself as the atoning sacrifice "once for all." How then does Paul dare to suggest that Christ’s sufferings are somehow insufficient? Wesley’s answer to this question points to the heart of the faithful Christian life lived together with and before God in the world.

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